The view of the internet as collaborating for leisure purposes is something I cannot really relate to because I do not play video games and I spend as little time online as possible. Fortunately, my boyfriend loves playing MMORPG’s I can use his experiences to relate to the matter. Often times I’ll be sitting at my computer doing homework when all of a sudden I hear, “They’re over in the corner!” Out of context I might get scared and think someone was in my house trying to tackle me from the corner of the room. However, I know this is just my boyfriend warning his fellow game players that the enemy is hiding and that they should start shooting in that direction. It is strange to me that collaboration in this context is of the utmost importance to some people, it’s like they’re really at war and letting your teammates down is the worst thing that could happen. The internet facilitates these processes on such a grand scale that it is hard to tell whether it influences or creates the norms of gaming. I know that without the internet my boyfriend would never be playing with people across the world. This online culture has a brotherhood (or sisterhood) of game players that might only exit in the physical world for a few more years, or only in athletic competitions. I mean, when was the last time you went over a friend’s house to play a board game?

Image Image borrowed from www.flickr.com 

Image Image borrowed from death-gfx.deviantart.com

 

Online fandom is a different world all on its own and I have mixed feelings about the way fan culture interacts with media. The collective process is all well and good until something believes someone else is stealing their content. I also feel that fans may not have to work as hard as people coming up with characters and plot on their own and do not deserve as much credit as original authors.

Image Image borrowed from everlastingdarkness5.deviantart.com 

The view of gamification is something I can relate to more personally because we participate in that kind of framework whenever we participate in Second Life class. We may blend the lines between work and play a lot more than we realize even in this very class. I have another class this semester in which we use Twitter and the rules bend because although it is an academic course, we’re allowed to use internet slang like “ur” instead of “you are”. I think we are better off writing professionally for now but eventually proper writing may be lost all together because there is no need for it, especially if academics are giving up on it. Lack of proper grammar and spelling is not the only way that we alter our communication in mediated contexts like online classrooms. The way we speak would be considered rude in a physical classroom. Speaking out of turn, addressing multiple conversations at once, running around, and other acts would be frowned upon in one setting but is completely normal and sometimes even necessary online. 

Image Image borrowed from commons.wikimedia.org

Image Image borrowed from www.flickr.com 

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